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Six Ayurvedic Ways To Deal With Child Diabetes

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Six Ayurvedic Ways To Deal With Child Diabetes

Eating Right
Usually, people tend to eat too many times a day. But Ayurveda recommends two meals in a day, at the most 3, is ideal since eating too often can tax the pancreas, forcing it to release too much insulin, which can lead to insulin resistance. Though everyone can’t stick to a two-time meal regime, since that will vary based on the type of Diabetes. Foods with sugar or a high glycemic index obviously need to be avoided. If you want to give rice to your child, make sure the rice is older than 10 years. Old rice is consumable for diabetics.

According to Ayurveda, mostly all fruits and vegetables, in limited quantities, are allowed. Some fruits like berries and pomegranates are recommended for diabetics. Bitter gourd and Indian blackberry are very useful in controlling blood sugar levels. Children can also have One apple a day. There need not be too many restrictions on food for children, which can make it stressful.

Managing The Body Clock
The 2017 Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded to 3 scientists for their work on circadian rhythms (or the internal clocks) governing human life. Our inner bio clock helps the body adapt to the different conditions outside and inside of the body. And living in alignment with these clocks keeps our body healthy. Our traditional system of medicine has since time immemorial recommended fixed meal times, and fixed hours of sleep in order to stay in tune with the body’s cycles. This regularity is much needed for children, particularly if they are in the pre-diabetic stage.

Herbs To Help Children Deal With The Condition
Amla and turmeric are good for not only increasing immunity but also keeping complications from building up. Medicines like Mehantaka Vati and Nisha Malaki are a combination of these two herbs and are regularly prescribed in Ayurveda. Amla significantly boosts insulin production.

Regular Detox
Periodic detoxing the body leads the body’s natural bio intelligence to fall into place and supports healing. Panchakarma cleanses can help here. Vasti, an ancient Ayurvedic technique is known to manage sugar levels in the body and revs up metabolism.

Move it!
Children need to be outside, playing physical games. They need more playground time and less screen time. Yoga, SKY technique for children and meditation and other forms of exercise are some of the most effective ways to manage stress, another major trigger for Diabetes.

Yoga Asanas You Can Try:
Here are some Asanas and Pranayamas that can help children:
• Bhujangasana
• Salabhasana
• Dhanurasana
• Paschimottanasana
• Sarvangasana
• Halasana
• Jal Neti and Kapalbhati practices can also help
• Pranayamas such as Nadi Shodhana, Ujjayi and Chandra Bhedana can be very powerful ways of reducing stress and pressure in children.

Peadiatrics

Infant obesity can be mitigated with a good night’s sleep: Study

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Infant obesity can be mitigated with a good night’s sleep: Study

It is a known fact that a good night sleep is a cure to many health related issues. New research from investigators at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital and collaborators suggests that newborns who sleep longer and wake up less throughout the night are less likely to be overweight in infancy.

“While an association between insufficient sleep and weight gain is well-established in adults and older children, this link has not been previously recognized in infants,” said study co-author Susan Redline, MD, MPH, senior physician in the Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders at the Brigham.

Susan Redline added, “In this study, we found that not only shorter nighttime sleep, but more sleep awakenings, were associated with a higher likelihood of infants becoming overweight in the first six months of life.”

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Peadiatrics

Screen time impacts eye sight in children: Study

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Screen time impacts eye sight in children: Study

As per a new study, screen time is directly linked to the severity of myopia or short-sightedness. This could be found in children and young adults.

The researchers examined more than 3,000 studies investigating smart device exposure and myopia in children and young adults aged between 3 months old and 33 years old.

After analysing, they revealed that high levels of smart device screen time, such as looking at a mobile phone, is associated with around a 30 per cent higher risk of myopia and, when combined with excessive computer use, that risk rose to around 80 per cent.

 

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Peadiatrics

Common cold virus landing many kids in ICU: Doctors

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Common cold virus landing many kids in ICU: Doctors

Paediatric intensivists across city hospitals are seeing a rise in children in need of intensive care following infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a type of seasonal common cold virus.

More than Covid, RSV and dengue are currently keeping hospitals’ intensive care unit doctors on their toes. RSV is a common cold virus that affects children mainly under five years of age and does not have a specific therapy.

“Last year there were hardly any RSV patients at our paediatric ICU. Even in 2019, we didn’t have as many cases as now. This year, in addition to dengue, we started seeing kids with RSV in the ICU from the last week of July and now, such cases are peaking,” said Deenanath Mangeshkar hospital’s paediatric intensivist Sumant Patil.

Surya Mother and Child Care superspeciality hospital’s chief paediatrician and neonatologist Sachin Shah said, “Since July, we have had nearly 50 admissions per month to the paediatric ICU due to respiratory infections. Quite a few test positive for RSV.”

Outbreaks of respiratory infections are common during the monsoon. “But the awareness is higher this year due to increased testing facilities. PCR-based diagnostic modalities are available which — though costly — can be performed for diagnosis of influenza viruses and RSV,” Shah said.

Bharati medical college and hospital has one of the biggest paediatric units in Pune. “We see 7-10 cases every day. About 25% of these kids with RSV need PICU care,” said hospital’s deputy medical director Jitendra Oswal.

RSV causes inflammation of the respiratory system, collection of excessive mucoid secretions clogging tiny airways, causing inadequate oxygenation, breathing difficulties, and prolonged and very bad coughing. The kids become infected suffer from exhaustion and weakness as their feeding is significantly reduced. Their breathing becomes abnormal and fast due to inadequate oxygen intake, weakening them further and needing ICU care.

Not every child clinically suspected undergoes a swab test for the confirmation of RSV. “We are treating 10-12 kids with confirmed RSV in our paediatric ICU every month,” Patil said.

Kids who turn severe following RSV mainly need prolonged respiratory support in the form of oxygen therapy and high flow nasal cannula or CPAP support.

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