Connect with us

Mental Health

Here’s how you can reduce anxiety

Published

on

Here’s how you can reduce anxiety

These days, being anxious is one of the most common problems and if you think this is something you can’t treat, then you are definitely wrong. Anxiety can be reduced by following few mindful practices. You can implement them in your everyday life and see the wonderful results for yourself.

We have summed up all the useful tips for you to reduce the anxiety and its issues. Give a quick read.

1. Get out from Social Media: While social media platforms offer immense advantages, they can also give you many health problems. And, anxiety is definitely one of them. Take a break from them or set a limit to the usage of such handles. You will see the difference for yourself.
2. Journal it down: A journal can help you see the thing very clear. Just pen down those thoughts for 5 minutes every day and soothe your racing mind. We recommend you to write three best things that happened in your day.
3. Go for a walk: A walk will help you in many ways and trust us, you will feel refreshing and energetic by taking a little from your chores and going on a walk for even 30 minutes a day. Give a try and see how you feel.
4. Look around: We highly recommend you to look around at times instead of staring and scrolling at those screens. Put your phone aside, go out, take few deep breaths, feel your senses and enjoy those surroundings. It will help a lot.
5. Meditate: Doing meditation is a great thing to start for anxiety related troubles. Zone out from those hectic days and find peace by meditating few minutes every day. Nothing can beat meditation. Trust us!
6. Try colouring and doodling: Yes, you heard that right! Doodling and colouring can help you to focus on your concentration and helps your mind to relax.
7. Leave your phone behind: We totally agree that the world runs on technology but that doesn’t mean we have to live with it at all moments. Limit your screen time and start living the moments.
8. Do one thing at a time: Segregate your work into segments and finish it off at your own pace instead of working on multiple things at a time. It will definitely work for anyone. Give your undivided attention to one task at one time.

Mental Health

Do you know sleep is linked to mental health?

Published

on

By

Do you know sleep is linked to mental health?

A good night sleep matters a lot and is definitely linked to the mental health. Experts always advise to get adequate sleep for mental well-being. Because a good sleep rejuvenates and regulates emotions. Also, it heals heart and blood vessels.

A good night sleep helps you to stay fresh throughout the day, hence increasing your productivity and boosting confidence.

As per a global study, 45% of the respondents surveyed have reported heightened anxiety, and 24% said they observed heightened feelings of depression due to lack of sleep during the pandemic.

 

Continue Reading

Mental Health

Study: Use of Cannabis can worsen risk of poor mental health

Published

on

By

Study: Use of Cannabis can worsen risk of poor mental health

For sure, use of cannabis has been restricted to health related drugs especially for people suffering insomnia and anxiety. But a new study sound that people who actually have a history of cannabis use are incidentally at a much-graver risk of poor mental health outcomes and experiencing problems like depression, anxiety and other severe mental issues.

“The research reaffirms the need to ensure a public health approach to recreational drug use across the UK,” said researcher Joht Singh Chandan from the University of Birmingham.

“We must continue to progress measures to improve the prevention and detection of drug use as well as implement the appropriate supportive measures in an equitable manner to prevent the secondary negative health consequences,” Chandan added.

Continue Reading

Mental Health

Virtual reality for mental health

Published

on

By

Mental health

Welcome to a new wave of psychological research — VR content that’s primarily designed to aid exposure therapy. Exposure therapy is a treatment for anxiety disorders, exposing patients to anxiety-inducing stimuli in a safe, controlled environment. During VR therapy, one straps on a headset, sinks into the past, faces one’s fears albeit in a controlled manner and overcome the disorders in real life. It aims at making patients eventually learn that the “threats” they perceive are not actually very dangerous.

Post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD), anxiety attacks and different phobias are battles many fight within themselves. The pandemic has even contributed to worsening these disorders in some. Fear, anger, worry, frustration, etc. keep many on the edge even as they desperately look for solutions to control their mind from going berserk.

VR therapy appears to shine a new ray of hope in ending these mental health issues or helping in controlling the mind from coming unmoored. Doctors across the globe are increasingly suggesting VR therapy to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

The technology, which immerses a patient in a 3D environment mimicking a traumatic memory or other mental health issues, is catching up in India as well and showing promising results.

VR: the next big thing for mental health

Dr Jaydip Chaudhuri, Senior Neuro Physician at Yashoda Hospitals, Hyderabad, explains how VR and augmented reality (AR), which use computer-generated situations, help mental health patients.

“Patients with anxiety and mental disorders perceive these computer-generated situations using special high-end goggles. It appears to be a potential diagnostic and therapeutic tool for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other dementias,” he says, adding that studies have shown that VR therapy to definitely benefit patients with dementia and help their care-givers and families to a significant extent. “Patients with dementia were found to have reduced aggression and interacted better with their caregivers when they were treated and exposed to VR therapy.”

How it works

Taking us through the intervention technique, Dr Nirali Bhatia, Cyber Psychologist & Psychotherapist, provides an example of a client who has a fear of height “What they normally do is to use an intervention technique, called guided imagery, in which clients are asked to visualise the scenario and stimulate that whole experience. They are then guided to work towards it while their bodily changes are closely watched.

“This process requires the client to be able to cognitively get into that trance. At every level, the client’s feelings are monitored,” Dr Nirali says, adding that VR’s easy and life-like simulation can be applied to every client irrespective of the barriers of language or cognitivity.

The doctor further describes the process. “VR therapy applies a stimulus environment where the client is slowly asked to move to the next floor. At every level, the client’s made to notice their feelings, regarding how they were feeling previously and whether they’re feeling better,” says the doctor. “At that point, if anxiety or palpitations show up in the client or their body movements, we immediately intervene and guide them on how to handle it. Then, we slowly move on to the next level. VR applications work with a controlled exposure, which eventually make clients well prepared to handle those scenarios in real life.”

What lies ahead in VR therapy

Doctors describe VR therapy as a “major breakthrough” in treating mental health disorders, calling it the next big thing in the medical field though it’s yet to fully enter the mainstream.

Experts, however, clarify that some clients would need several simulations ‘sittings’ to get better results. For some, each session could feel as if they were in a fantasy novel.

Dr Krishna Sahiti, consultant psychiatrist in Apollo Hospital, Jubilee Hills, says they use audio and visual aids to slowly increase the intensity of the stimulus in VR. “Physical symptoms and psychological reaction are assessed slowly. Clients who avoid and are fearful about the stimulus will experience the stimulus with the help of a psychiatrist and in a protected environment, which is hassle-free,” the doctor informs. “In further sessions the intensity of stimulus is slowly increased so that we can help the patient experience the stimulus without symptoms while helping them.”

Continue Reading

Trending