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Peadiatrics

5 easy exercises to increase your child’s height

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5 easy exercises to increase your child's height

While it’s completely fine to be of any height – short, medium or tall, we want our kids to have a good height as it adds to their overall personality and confidence.

While genetics do play an important role in determining the height of a person, the truth is there are many physical factors that can influence height. Here are the 5 most effective exercises that will help your kids to achieve their maximum height.

Swimming

Swimming improves flexibility and stimulates the cells within the body. Swimming helps in stimulating every muscle, which helps in increasing the height naturally.

Hanging exercises

Hanging is one of the best exercises to increase height. It helps in increasing the endurance of your arms and stimulates your upper body muscles. This also helps in toning the body and shaping it up. The toning and shaping of the body can help in increasing the height

Toe touching

Toe touching is an easy exercise that stimulates the muscles in your back and calves and gives your thigh muscles a nice massage. Try to touch your toes but do not push yourself beyond your limits. You can make your kids perform the exercise from an early age.

Cobra pose

To perform a cobra pose, lie down on your tummy and slowly lift your upper body. Bend as much as your body permits to enhance the growing capabilities of your body cells. This will help in increasing the height.

Skipping rope

Skipping rope is a fun activity that everyone enjoys. The activity helps in increasing the height. Jumping triggers the cells of your body from head to toe and makes the cell active. This type of muscle work is best for the streamlined growth of our body and increasing height.

 

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Peadiatrics

Screen time impacts eye sight in children: Study

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Screen time impacts eye sight in children: Study

As per a new study, screen time is directly linked to the severity of myopia or short-sightedness. This could be found in children and young adults.

The researchers examined more than 3,000 studies investigating smart device exposure and myopia in children and young adults aged between 3 months old and 33 years old.

After analysing, they revealed that high levels of smart device screen time, such as looking at a mobile phone, is associated with around a 30 per cent higher risk of myopia and, when combined with excessive computer use, that risk rose to around 80 per cent.

 

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Peadiatrics

Common cold virus landing many kids in ICU: Doctors

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Common cold virus landing many kids in ICU: Doctors

Paediatric intensivists across city hospitals are seeing a rise in children in need of intensive care following infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a type of seasonal common cold virus.

More than Covid, RSV and dengue are currently keeping hospitals’ intensive care unit doctors on their toes. RSV is a common cold virus that affects children mainly under five years of age and does not have a specific therapy.

“Last year there were hardly any RSV patients at our paediatric ICU. Even in 2019, we didn’t have as many cases as now. This year, in addition to dengue, we started seeing kids with RSV in the ICU from the last week of July and now, such cases are peaking,” said Deenanath Mangeshkar hospital’s paediatric intensivist Sumant Patil.

Surya Mother and Child Care superspeciality hospital’s chief paediatrician and neonatologist Sachin Shah said, “Since July, we have had nearly 50 admissions per month to the paediatric ICU due to respiratory infections. Quite a few test positive for RSV.”

Outbreaks of respiratory infections are common during the monsoon. “But the awareness is higher this year due to increased testing facilities. PCR-based diagnostic modalities are available which — though costly — can be performed for diagnosis of influenza viruses and RSV,” Shah said.

Bharati medical college and hospital has one of the biggest paediatric units in Pune. “We see 7-10 cases every day. About 25% of these kids with RSV need PICU care,” said hospital’s deputy medical director Jitendra Oswal.

RSV causes inflammation of the respiratory system, collection of excessive mucoid secretions clogging tiny airways, causing inadequate oxygenation, breathing difficulties, and prolonged and very bad coughing. The kids become infected suffer from exhaustion and weakness as their feeding is significantly reduced. Their breathing becomes abnormal and fast due to inadequate oxygen intake, weakening them further and needing ICU care.

Not every child clinically suspected undergoes a swab test for the confirmation of RSV. “We are treating 10-12 kids with confirmed RSV in our paediatric ICU every month,” Patil said.

Kids who turn severe following RSV mainly need prolonged respiratory support in the form of oxygen therapy and high flow nasal cannula or CPAP support.

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Peadiatrics

Only 10% of kids with ADHD outgrow it: Study

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Only 10% of kids with ADHD outgrow it: Study

A new study stated that most children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) don’t outgrow the disorder. The study added that it manifests itself in adulthood in different ways and waxes and wanes over a lifetime.

The researchers said that ADHD is a neurobiological disorder typically detected in childhood that persists into adulthood in approximately 50 percent of cases but this new study found just 10 percent of children completely outgrow it.

Lead researcher Margaret Sibley, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioural sciences at the University of Washington, said, “It’s important for people diagnosed with ADHD to understand that it’s normal to have times in your life where things may be more unmanageable and other times when things feel more under control.”

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